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Pet Nutrition and Animal Wellness

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July 23, 2014 | 1,919 Views

Despondent even after being rescued, see a pet goat’s reaction when he’s reunited with his old friend.

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mji238
2856 days ago
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Pleasant Garden, NC
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Full Moon Names of the Year

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Over the centuries, cultures around the world have given specific full moon names for each month.  These full moon names tell us much about the way these early cultures set schedules for hunting, planting and harvesting. They also explain how plants, animals and weather patterns typically behave during a particular month.  Photo courtesy FrenchFinds.co.uk/Flickr.

In this post, Seasonal Wisdom reveals some of the old full moon names that were given by the Algonquin tribes from New England to Lake Superior, as well as European settlers and other cultures. Come take a peek.

A Year of Full Moon Names

January: The Wolf Moon

Packs of hungry wolves howling on a cold January night are the inspiration of this full moon name. Other popular names were Old Moon, Ice Moon and Moon After Yule.

February: Snow Moon

February is often the coldest and snowiest month of the year.  Other common names were Storm Moon and Hunger Moon, as food reserves ran low and early cultures waited for spring to return.

March: Worm Moon

As the ground thaws, the worm trails that start appearing around now inspired Native Americans’ name for this moon. Other names included Crow Moon, named after the cawing of crows as the weather warms. The Crust Moon describes how March snow can get crusted from daytime thawing and nighttime freezing. The Sap Moon meant it was time to tap the maple trees. And some settlers called this time the Lenten Moon for religious reasons.

Full Moon Names include April's Pink Moon

Photo by QwinCowper/Flickr

April: Pink Moon

Herb moss pinks and wild ground phlox are early widespread flowers in spring. Their pink color led to this month’s full moon name. Full Sprouting Grass Moon, Egg Moon and Fish Moon were other popular names.

May: Full Flower Moon

April showers bring May flowers. So, it’s little wonder how this month got its name of Flower Month. Other names were Corn Planting Moon and Milk Moon, which showed important farming tasks for the month. Hare Moon was another name, indicating the animals are prevalent now.

June: Strawberry Moon

Strawberries are harvested in North America during this month, so the sweet fruit is honored with a full moon name. Other names were Hot Moon for the steamy weather, and Rose Moon by Europeans as the beloved flowers bloom this month.

July: Buck Moon

Male deer (or bucks) begin to regrow their antlers around now, after shedding them each year. Thus, giving the moon its name.  Thunder Moon is another popular name, because of the month’s many storms. Hay Moon signified the July harvest time.

August: Sturgeon Moon

Native Americans named this moon after a large fish called sturgeon, which was readily available in August.  Green Corn Moon and Grain Moon were other names that detailed farming and gardening chores. Red Moon was named after the reddish color the moon often appears when rising now.

September: Full Corn Moon or Harvest Moon

Now is the time to harvest corn, leading to the Corn Moon name. The Harvest Moon is the full moon that happens closest to the Autumn Equinox. It’s an especially bright moon, which allows beans, corn, squash and other summer crops to be easily harvested now. Other names include the Barley Moon.

Full moon names came from every culture.Photo by PennStateNews/Flickr

October: Hunter’s Moon

Often called Blood Moon, Hunter’s Moon or Sanguine Moon, because this was the time to hunt and store meat for the long winter. The particularly bright moon was also called the Travel Moon and the Dying Grass Moon.

November: Beaver Moon

This moon gets its name either because beavers build their winter dams now, or because beaver traps are set in November.  No one is quite sure. But the other name is Frost Moon. No one from the northern climates has any questions about that name.

December: Cold Moon

The December days are shorter and colder. The nights are longer and increasing in length until the Winter Solstice in the Northern Hemisphere. It’s easy to understand why this moon was often called Cold Moon, Long Nights Moon or Moon Before Yule.

Sources: The Farmer’s Almanac, National Geographic

Learn More: The Chinese Solar Calendar was another traditional way to consider time, and the seasons were tied to the natural world.

The post Full Moon Names of the Year appeared first on Seasonal Wisdom.

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mji238
3044 days ago
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Pleasant Garden, NC
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This Pizza Box Will Change Our Lives Forever

7 Comments and 22 Shares
This Pizza Box Will Change Our Lives Forever

Submitted by: Unknown

Tagged: gif , pizza , design , genius , funny , g rated , win
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mji238
3209 days ago
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Pleasant Garden, NC
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7 public comments
beslayed
3208 days ago
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Pizza box
JamesDiGioia
3208 days ago
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That's pretty awesome.
NYC
janwillemswane
3210 days ago
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Slim!
Amstelveen, NL
RedSonja
3210 days ago
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NICE.
smadin
3210 days ago
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one of my local pizza places uses this kind of box.
Boston
ScottInPDX
3212 days ago
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This is genius.
Portland, Oregon, USA, Earth

This Could Just Become My PC Troubleshooting Tool Of Choice

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If you're a regular reader of these pages then you'll know that I love utilities which let you monitor the state of a PC. You know the sort of thing: processor utilization, disk space, free RAM, and so on. It's a great way to ensure that your PC is running smoothly, and it's also a useful method of troubleshooting a friend or colleague's PC if they're having unspecified problems with it.

Which is why I was so pleased to stumble across something recently called Glint. It's a program which displays real-time data in a simple-to-understand format. You can choose from bars or graphs, as you can see from the screen shots below. You can choose from hundreds of counters to display, and you can pick your own labels for each one if you don't like the defaults. You can even monitor remote computers across your network.

Here's the best bit. Glint is tiny (less than 0.5 MB), portable, and free. And it works on everything from Windows 2000 to Windows 8. - Robert Schifreen


http://www.techsupportalert.com/content/could-just-become-my-pc-troubleshooting-tool-choice.htm
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mji238
3233 days ago
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Pleasant Garden, NC
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Wholly Wholesome Gluten-Free Pie Shells

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I dabble in baking here and there, but it’s not my strong suit.  So, when Wholly Wholesome Gluten-Free Pie Shells showed up at the National Foundation for Celiac Awareness (NFCA) office, I was happy to let our Director of Finance Sue Gardner take the lead.

Wholly Wholesome Gluten-Free Pie Shells: Shells

Wholly Wholesome Gluten-Free Pie Shells

She amazingly whipped up a delicious gluten-free chocolate pie in our office toaster oven – yes, a toaster oven.  Using only a chocolate pudding base, gluten-free whipped cream and semi-sweet chocolate chips, Sue set about making the pie.

Wholly Wholesome Gluten-Free Pie Shells: Chocolate Pie

Didn’t Sue do a great job on this pie?

What I loved most about the Wholly Wholesome Gluten-Free Pie Shells was their simplicity (Ok, so I know I technically didn’t bake this pie, but I can imagine how easy it can be!).  Ready-to-go pie shells are a great option for folks who want a homemade pie, but don’t have time to completely start from scratch.  Plus, Wholly Wholesome has done a great job of creating a sturdy, tasty gluten-free pie shell.  Those with other special dietary needs will be happy to know this gluten-free pie shell is kosher, vegan and dairy-free, too.  If you’re looking for a new pre-made pie shell, I definitely recommend giving these a try.

Check out the pie shells by visiting www.WhollyWholesome.com.  Not all of their products are gluten-free, so be sure to double check before making any purchases! They have a handy store locator on the right-hand side of their site so you can quickly and easily check for them in your area.

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mji238
3254 days ago
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Pleasant Garden, NC
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How do the online family tree programs compare?

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There are dozens and dozens of online programs allowing people to either enter or upload their family information. Most of those programs store the information in the form of a modified pedigree format based loosely on a traditional family oriented pedigree. Here is an example of a standard-type format for a pedigree which is also called an ancestor chart:


This particular chart came from some free forms online from the Mid-Continent Public Library. This format is very efficient and it would be hard to improve on this basic form. a few of the genealogical databases have experimented with variations, some more successful than others. I thought it would be interesting to see how three of the major online family tree programs approach this issue (with my usual comments, of course).

I had to stop for a minute and think about which program to talk about first. So I decided to start with the newest one, FamilySearch.org's Family Tree. Arguably in setting up the tree, they would have had the cumulative experience of all of their predecessors. Here is the first screen shot showing the basic FamilySearch Family Tree format.


The design is clearly adapted from the basic pedigree or ancestor chart. The main difference is that the basic chart starts with a single individual with space for a spouse. Family Tree has a space for a husband and a wife. I find this to be somewhat confusing and even disconcerting, for single people who look at this chart for the first time. Those never married or widowed often question what they are supposed to do with the blank spaces, particularly with the admonition to "Add a husband" or "Add a wife." I have had several comments questioning the form for that reason. I think you can emphasize the family without making singles feel left out.

This format is also confusing to people for the first time, because they have to sort out which line they are following. It does an adequate job of allowing users to navigate as long as people realize that the families are represented by the parents and that not all parents are showing. Navigating up the pedigree is fairly easy and the layout is clean and uncluttered, if that is a virtue.

FamilySearch Family Tree most recently added a fan chart view of the pedigree. Here is a screen shot of the fan chart view of the same person:


You may already know from my pervious posts that I am not a fan of fan charts. But it is a nice display and certainly gives a graphic representation of the families in the file. It is interesting that in this format the individual is treated as unique and no spouse in mandatorily shown next to the center name and there are no blank spaces for the missing spouse except at the bottom of the chart.

Next is Ancestry.com. Here is a screen shot of the same individual that I used in the Family Tree examples:


It is readily apparent that the Ancestry.com Family Tree is about the same as the roughly equivalent FamilySearch Family Tree. The major difference is that it starts with an individual and has a spouse, if there is one, in a pull-down menu. The problem of how to depict the family is then solved by putting the spouses in different boxes. If for no other reason, I like this view better because it shows a sensitivity to those who may not have and have no hope of having a spouse's line to work on. The lack of a spouse in not then emphasized. When navigating with both FamilySearch Family Tree and Ancestry.com Family Trees, you are forced to navigate up through the tree unless you happen to know the name or ID number of the person you are searching for.

Ancestry.com has another even more traditional family tree view called the "Family View." Here is a screenshot of the Family View"


Of course, you can zoom in and out on this format, but I find it relatively more difficult to use and seldom go to this view on purpose. Rather than being informative, it is mostly confusing. I am glad Ancestry.com has provided a different pedigree type view. I am sure that this is a matter of personal preference.

Next, I am going to MyHeritage.comwhich also has two different ancestor chart views to choose from. Here is a screen shot of the Modern View:


As you can see, MyHeritage.com has a view similar to Ancestry.com's Family View. Both of these suffer from a difficulty of finding ancestors and navigating around the huge chart when the words are large enough to read. I resort to using the search function rather than trying to find anyone using the family tree view. The Classic View is almost the same, except it is more compact and easier to navigate. Here is a screen shot of the Classic View:


Neither of these views is particularly easy to use. I would prefer a horizontally oriented chart, but that is a personal opinion. As with most of the other examples, if a spouse is missing, there is no line shown. In fact, to save clutter, the spouse's tree, if present, is not shown unless selected.

There are, of course a multitude of other forms of family trees, but combined these three trees probably contain more individuals that there presently are alive in the entire world: not to say everyone is represented, counting for duplicates, of course. With those large numbers it is extremely important to have an interface that is easy to navigate. Both Ancestry.com and FamilySearch Family Tree fall into that category, but there are other concerns that make each of the trees strong in some features and views and weak in others.

All that said, I would not make a decision to use or not use a family tree program based on the user interface alone. The other features of the program are much more important to me.
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mji238
3254 days ago
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Pleasant Garden, NC
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